Market Place . Belford . Northumberland . NE70 7NE Tel: (01668) 213543   Email: enquiries@bluebellhotel.com
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    Bird Watching

bird-contentThe Blue Bell Hotel is ideally situated the stunning area of Northumberland described by the Daily Telegraph as ‘a birdwatcher’s paradise’. With such varied landscapes ranging from coastal areas and moorland to woodlands and sprawling mudflats, the county truly does have every habitat a birdwatcher could wish for.

Renowned the world over for its rare breeds and colonies of breeding birds, the Northumberland coast plays host to a number of nature reserves and locations of scientific interest.

The summer breeding season sees the area come to life with the frantic commotion of a whole host of birds including terns, puffins and guillemots.

The autumn season sees the coast become centre stage to songbirds such as warblers, and wading birds including the ringed plover. Winter sees the arrival of waterfowl and waders of great international significance, and the gathering of the long-tailed duck on Bamburgh beach does not disappoint.

Inland bird watching is at its best in the dramatic landscapes of the North Pennines where rare breeds flourish amongst the diverse and rich habitation. The curlew, with its distinctive song is at home here and one of the world’s most endangered birds.

The grasslands provide habitat for the largest flocks of snipe and lapwing whilst the heather moorlands help sustain the region’s birds of prey which include the peregrine falcon and merlin.

Inland bird watching is at its best in the dramatic landscapes of the North Pennines where rare breeds flourish amongst the diverse and rich habitation. The curlew, with its distinctive song is at home here and one of the world’s most endangered birds.

The grasslands provide habitat for the largest flocks of snipe and lapwing whilst the heather moorlands help sustain the region’s birds of prey which include the peregrine falcon and merlin.

The nearby Farne Islands are perfect for birdlovers. 290 species of bird have been recorded on the Islands, including in the 18th century, the now extinct Great Auk. Today, the breeding season sees around 20 different species coming to the Farnes, leading to total numbers in the region of 100,000 birds. The diverse species include Oystercatchers, Gannets and Eider Ducks. With landscapes to support such a variety and cross section of rare and fascinating birds, Northumberland’s status as a birdwatcher’s paradise is well earned.